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current news…

What Rupert is up to…

Rupert is:

  • appearing in an ITV show called Judge Rinder’s Crown Court to be screened in two parts, at 8pm on Friday 8 and Friday 15 December 2017. Rupert plays the man accused of murder, James Byron. This is a remake of the ITV show Crown Court, which ran from 1972 to 1984. update: I’ve created a page for it here.
  • attending Medway Comic and Screen Festival on 24 March 2018, along with Tom Hopper and Alex Vlahos (Percival and Mordred in Merlin). Rupert isn’t listed on the official website yet, but it has been announced by Dan John, who manages his event appearances.
  • attending EM-CON Worcester on 8 April 2018 as a media guest, with autographs and photographs available.
  • appearing in Will, a 10-episode series on Shakespeare with a rock n’ roll aesthetic. It looks like the sort of thing you’ll either love or hate – and I’m hoping I’ll love it! IMDB page, with no listing for Rupert. Confirmed with Rupert, who says he’s playing Sir Walter Raleigh! Release date of 10 July in the US and 20 September in Spain. update: He is now listed on IMDB as appearing in the episode 104 “Brave New World”.
  • appearing in a film called The Tutor, with a 2017 release date.  This is listed on IMDB, but it hasn’t happened yet, and he suspects it won’t happen now.

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The following entries have been updated:

Continue reading current news…

Judge Rinder’s Crown Court (2017)

Rupert appeared as the defendant, James Byron, in this first episode (shown in two parts) of Judge Rinder’s Crown Court. This is the ‘pilot’ for a return of the long-running drama Crown Court, which aired on ITV from 1972 to 1984. The idea is that a ‘real life’ court case is explored through the show, and we can then form our own opinions on the guilt or innocence of the accused, and on whether the verdict and sentence were appropriate.

In this case, James Byron was accused of murdering his wife, Anna Byron, with poison. More than that, I will not say! And I haven’t looked up the original case. I’m just enjoying the sheer drama of it all at the moment.

  • Episode: 1
  • Broadcast: 8 and 15 December 2017
  • Director: Vicky Thomas
  • Links: ITV Hub

There are a number of ‘flashback’ scenes in the first episode, which are lovely, of course – though I always find them a bit problematic. Are we meant to take them as the truth, or are they dramatised versions of the current testimony?

Anyway, Rupert does a lovely job, and also looks superbly handsome in the court room. But, you know, this impression may well change once we learn more in the second part of the ep!

I’ve taken the liberty of capturing some screenshots below (with great respect, but without permission). The episode is available to play on the ITV Hub for the next thirty days.

Happier times for Anna and James Byron (Rosina Carbone and Rupert).

Continue reading Judge Rinder’s Crown Court (2017)

London Carol Concert (2017)

Rupert took part in the London Carol Concert fundraising event for the Rainbow Trust, at St Paul’s Church in Knightsbridge, on the evening of 6 December 2017.

update: Rainbow Trust announced that the evening raised more than £30,000!

I went along, and it was a fantastic evening, with much lovely singing from a variety of acts, as well as the readings. Not to mention minced pies and mulled wine! And there was the delightful church itself, too – St Paul’s in Knightsbridge.

The people in the banner photo contributed the readings. From left to right, they are Robert Portal, Jason Flemyng, Mary Nightingale, Maureen Lipman, Rory McConnachie, Rupert, and Annabel Croft.

Rupert read the poem A Visit from St Nicholas (commonly known as ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas), by Clement Moore. He did a terrific job, of course, and put plenty of oomph into it.

I snuck a couple of photos, which aren’t very sharp, but hopefully the Rainbow Trust will share some of the official ones – of which there were plenty taken!

Rupert and Annabel Croft
Rupert and Annabel Croft

Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

interview by Julie at MCM Comic Con, London (2017)

I had the honour of interviewing Rupert on the Sunday afternoon at MCM Comic Con in London. He was just as obliging and delightful about it as you would imagine. One of the reasons I like him so much is that, whether it’s on panels or individually, he really does try to give honest and meaningful answers to whatever he is asked.

So, let’s get into it! I started off with a couple of easy ones…

What has been your favourite role, and why?

I’ll say Sir Leon [Merlin], because it’s opened up lots of doors, and I got to spend time with people, get close to people, film with amazing people, and film in amazing locations.

What was your favourite location?

Pierrefonds Castle.

Everyone says that!

Yeah, but it was amazing. It really was.

Chateau de Pierrefonds in France, also known as ‘Camelot’ (photo by Julie).

What do you look for in a director?

One that wants to hire me! Someone who has done their work, and is very passionate about the project they’re doing – and who I trust and can get the best out of me.

You really like Metin Hüseyin.

Love Metin, yeah. Love him.

Any particular reason?

I think he’s just kind, and very good and very gentle, and not too much ego. He wants the best out of actors, he really cares about performance. So, that’s why I love him.

What did you do in the few years between leaving school and studying with LAMDA?

I did lots of things. I taught in a school, I worked in the City, I worked in The GAP, I directed plays for children, taught drama – quite a lot of things.

Actually, when I first left school, I got accepted into musical theatre at drama school, but I couldn’t get the funding together. Which, in hindsight – I think when you’ve first left school, you’re desperate to start your life – and then you go, actually, it’s quite good to not do that. But obviously I wanted to be able to do musicals. I waited, and started doing a couple of plays before drama school – but it was very hard, and I knew I had to train. I applied for LAMDA, and that was it. Because by then I knew I didn’t want to just study musicals. I liked them, but I knew that I wanted to do other things.

Do you think it’s useful, though, to live a ‘real’ life for a while, work in ‘real’ jobs?

Yes, I think so. It’s weird because when you first do acting at school, it’s an extracurricular thing, which is amazing and really fun. However, when you go into it as a job, sometimes it’s so… it takes over your whole life, and sometimes you need to have other passions to keep you sane – and in acting you need to learn a lot of different things, different skills – that’s one of the reasons I love it.

I think it’s good to take time, but some people’s careers happen when they’re very young, and others’ careers are – I like to think I was going to be a ‘leading man’ as opposed to a ‘leading boy’. [laughs] Well, maybe not ‘leading’, but ‘man’.

Continue reading interview by Julie at MCM Comic Con, London (2017)

The Good Karma Hospital (2017)

Rupert appeared as Sunshine ‘Sunny’ Macintosh in an episode of The Good Karma Hospital, a six-episode tv series created by Dan Sefton. The character’s unusual first name can be explained by the fact that his father is an artist – and of course Sunny was a lovely baby!

The series is set in a coastal town in South India, but I understand that filming took place in Sri Lanka. Wherever it is, that’s one beautiful beach!

Sunny has come to India to find his estranged father Desmond (an excellent turn from Clive Russell), who wrote to Sunny, apparently unwell and asking to see him. Dr Fonseca (Amanda Redman) drives Sunny through the town’s Holi celebrations (hence the random scatterings of colour!) to track down Desmond in his artist’s lair.

Here’s some screen captures from the episode, which I copy here with the greatest respect but without permission. (All rights remain with Tiger Aspect Productions and ITV.)

Clive Russell and Rupert Young as father and son. I thought this was excellent casting!

Continue reading The Good Karma Hospital (2017)

Gaslight (2017)

Well, those of us able to catch Gaslight on its tour through England are in for another theatrical treat! This play is a classic thriller, written in 1938 by Patrick Hamilton, and set in a drawing room in Victorian-era London. This production is directed by Anthony Banks.

I loved the set, which was small and neat yet intricate, allowing for all kinds of surprises. The lighting and sound helped place the room in the real world, and also added greatly to the changing moods and a creeping sense of dread. Kudos to designer David Woodhead, lighting designer Howard Hudson, and composition and sound designers Ben and Max Ringham.

Rupert Young and Kara Tointon as the Manninghams (photo by Manuel Harlan)

Rupert is wonderful as Jack Manningham, the plausible, handsome husband who has turned into a plausible, manipulative terror. I’ve said it before, I know, but he really is far too good at this sort of thing. You can see why his young wife Bella married him, and why she still finds moments of happiness in their marriage – and you can also see how he could get away for too long with cruelly undermining her. Luckily for Bella, she has a friend or two she’s not yet aware of.

Kara Tointon is terrific as Bella, a bright young woman haunted by the memory of her mother dying insane. I won’t spoil anything, but even as the mysteries are revealed and her innocence reaffirmed, she still fears she’ll end up with the same fate.

Keith Allen is, of course, delightful as ‘Rough (a visitor)’ and delivers some of the funniest lines with great aplomb, while managing a great deal of stage business.

The main three actors are wonderfully supported by Helen Anderson, Charlotte Blackledge and the ensemble.

If you can go, I’d recommend it! The first night’s audience really enjoyed it, and I suspect we won’t be the only ones.

The play is touring England as follows. You can buy tickets via ATG Tickets, except where a separate ‘booking info’ link is provided below.

  • Birmingham, New Alexandra Theatre: 6-14 January 2017
  • Aylesbury, Waterside Theatre: 16-21 January 2017
  • Woking, New Victoria Theatre: 23-28 January 2017
  • York, Grand Opera House: 30 January – 4 February 2017
  • Brighton, Theatre Royal: 6-11 February 2017
  • Cambridge, Arts Theatre: 13-18 February 2017: booking info
  • Sheffield, Lyceum: 20-25 February 2017: booking info
  • Malvern Theatre: 27 February – 4 March: booking info
  • Richmond Theatre: 6-11 March 2017
  • Cardiff, New Theatre: 14-18 March 2017: booking info

P.S. It doesn’t hurt that Rupert looks so damned dapper in those clothes!

ETA: There is an interesting article about the lighting here. The lighting equipment was provided by the company White Light.

Reviews

It’s not, as Hamilton himself admitted, “a great work of art”. Poor Rupert Young – playing the manipulative bounder Jack with a judicious mixture of lordly but kindly condescension and explosive viciousness – even got booed at the opening-night curtain-call in Birmingham, as if this was panto. But the psychological essentials of this potboiler hold good, and, as with The Archers’ abuse storyline, who’s to say that real-life doesn’t acquire the hue of dark melodrama when male-female relations hit their nadir? 4 stars from Dominic Cavendish, The Telegraph, 11 January 2017

… the production relies heavily on the performances of its small cast as the plot gradually thickens. 4 stars from Diane Parkes, What’s On Stage, 12 January 2017

Testament to the terrifyingly convincing performance of the sadistic, psychotic Jack Manningham came by the chorus of boos actor Rupert Young received as he took a final bow at the New Alexandra Theatre where the production this week begins a national tour. Young oozed menace as he both charmed and petrified his tormented wife in a twisted power game. Humiliating her with his roving eye and deliberately shaming her before the servants to undermine and ostracise her, a cold chill swept the theatre as a hatred of the character developed. In his Victorian costume, Young swept onto the dimly-lit stage with his huge Jekyll-like shadow looming large and leaving the gripped audience biting their nails in apprehension as the tension built. Review by Diane Davies, Express and Star, 11 January 2017

While Rupert Young’s Jack Manningham is perhaps underplayed in the first half, after the interval he becomes frighteningly intense and scarily unpredictable as the air of threat increases. His moods swing ever more widely as he begins to suspect that something is now happening that is beyond even his control. 4 stars from Selwyn Knight, The Reviews Hub, 11 January 2017

… the real brilliance of Gaslight is unearthed in the joy of the actors’ craft … Going by the stellar performance the cast gave on opening night, you need to get your hands on some tickets, because it sounds like they have a whole lot more, if that’s even possible, to pull out of their theatrical bag. Review by Madeleine Bourne, Redbrick, 11 January 2017

As her bullying husband, Jack, Rupert Young domineers, exuding evil. What begins as a study in mental cruelty swiftly becomes something even darker as the true nature of the man Bella married is brought to light. … You can tell it’s working when the villain is booed during his curtain call! Review by William Stafford, Bum on a Seat, 11 January 2017

… the play’s real chill lies in the warped dynamic between Bella and her husband. Young oozes psychological menace as he slowly picks away at his wife’s grip on sanity … 4 stars from Claire Allfree, Metro, 13 January 2017

This suspenseful play kept me engaged throughout, with each character easily holding my attention. It’s a production that had everything, from gradually building tension to surprising but greatly welcome humour. It’s a shame it wasn’t longer, though – it was such a pleasure to watch that the time flew by way too quickly. Gaslight is definitely one not to be missed. 5 stars from Rhian Atherton, What’s On Birmingham, 11 January 2017

Jack is an increasingly unstable person and there were moments during the performance where the audience were genuinely shocked at the relationship breakdown between the couple; however this is to the credit of Young and Tointon with some incredibly intense and believable action on stage. … If you want to watch a play and like a twist, then this is for you. Witty, mysterious and beautiful all at the same time. Review by Matt Dudley, Black Country Radio, 11 January 2017

Rounding out the cast is the brilliant Helen Anderson as Elizabeth the housekeeper, and the delightful Charlotte Blackledge as the sassy and flirtacious maid Nancy. Anderson is a master at playing an audience and her scenes with Rupert Young’s darkly disturbing Mr Manningham are particularly enjoyable. Charlotte Blackledge, as Nancy, gets the majority of the laughs of the night, flouncing about with a sour look for her mistress and a lusty one for her master. It is clear director Anthony Banks has had lots of fun in the rehearsal room and the cast mesh beautifully. … A thoroughly exciting evening, with a great cast, Gaslight remains a pertinent piece. 4 stars from Carly Halse, Female Arts, 16 January 2017

Rupert Young gives an outstanding performance. He is completely despicable as Jack Manning the coercive, cruel and calculating husband. His manipulative, menacing character is truly hateful. … This psychological thriller, with palpable moments of edge of the seat tension is a real must see production. 3 stars from Melanie Mitchell, Rewrite This Story, 23 January 2017

The plot is by no mean the most challenging of whodunnits, but the production is well worth seeing. The casting is excellent. Rupert Young towers over Kara Tointon’s slight and frail-looking figure, emphasising visually how his character is able to dominate her. And Keith Allen’s bewhiskered detective adds many moments of levity to such a dark plot. The play is driven along by the skills of the lead actors. In particular, Keith Allen, who encompasses the voracious, and sometimes excitable, character of Rough with great aplomb and adds some wonderful comedic moments. Review by Steve Cowell, York Mix, 31 January 2017

Rupert Young as Jack shows enormous stage presence, physically towering over the frail and pasty Bella as he switches from unctuous and patronising to a furious bully in an instant. … The wonderful set and costumes focus our attention on the drama and the details. However, it’s the acting of the three main characters that carry this through – as an audience we know what’s coming, and Gaslight is all the more fun for that. A great evening, catch it if you can. Review by Gary Cook, The Brighton Magazine, 7 February 2017

Rupert Young plays manipulative and deceiving husband Jack with a mixture of haughtiness, condescension and even, at some points, he’s down right vicious. His character is booed at curtain-call, as if this were panto. Not because the character was terribly played, far from that, but without wishing to spoil what happens, the character got what he deserved. Overall, Gaslight is a dark, yet shining example of a thriller done good. Thoroughly recommend. Review by Hannah Hopkins, Quench, 14 March 2017

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