Category Archives: work

The Good Karma Hospital (2017)

Rupert appeared as Sunshine ‘Sunny’ Macintosh in an episode of The Good Karma Hospital, a six-episode tv series created by Dan Sefton. The character’s unusual first name can be explained by the fact that his father is an artist – and of course Sunny was a lovely baby!

The series is set in a coastal town in South India, but I understand that filming took place in Sri Lanka. Wherever it is, that’s one beautiful beach!

Sunny has come to India to find his estranged father Desmond (an excellent turn from Clive Russell), who wrote to Sunny, apparently unwell and asking to see him. Dr Fonseca (Amanda Redman) drives Sunny through the town’s Holi celebrations (hence the random scatterings of colour!) to track down Desmond in his artist’s lair.

Here’s some screen captures from the episode, which I copy here with the greatest respect but without permission. (All rights remain with Tiger Aspect Productions and ITV.)

Clive Russell and Rupert Young as father and son. I thought this was excellent casting!

Continue reading The Good Karma Hospital (2017)

Gaslight (2017)

Well, those of us able to catch Gaslight on its tour through England are in for another theatrical treat! This play is a classic thriller, written in 1938 by Patrick Hamilton, and set in a drawing room in Victorian-era London. This production is directed by Anthony Banks.

I loved the set, which was small and neat yet intricate, allowing for all kinds of surprises. The lighting and sound helped place the room in the real world, and also added greatly to the changing moods and a creeping sense of dread. Kudos to designer David Woodhead, lighting designer Howard Hudson, and composition and sound designers Ben and Max Ringham.

Rupert Young and Kara Tointon as the Manninghams (photo by Manuel Harlan)

Rupert is wonderful as Jack Manningham, the plausible, handsome husband who has turned into a plausible, manipulative terror. I’ve said it before, I know, but he really is far too good at this sort of thing. You can see why his young wife Bella married him, and why she still finds moments of happiness in their marriage – and you can also see how he could get away for too long with cruelly undermining her. Luckily for Bella, she has a friend or two she’s not yet aware of.

Kara Tointon is terrific as Bella, a bright young woman haunted by the memory of her mother dying insane. I won’t spoil anything, but even as the mysteries are revealed and her innocence reaffirmed, she still fears she’ll end up with the same fate.

Keith Allen is, of course, delightful as ‘Rough (a visitor)’ and delivers some of the funniest lines with great aplomb, while managing a great deal of stage business.

The main three actors are wonderfully supported by Helen Anderson, Charlotte Blackledge and the ensemble.

If you can go, I’d recommend it! The first night’s audience really enjoyed it, and I suspect we won’t be the only ones.

The play is touring England as follows. You can buy tickets via ATG Tickets, except where a separate ‘booking info’ link is provided below.

  • Birmingham, New Alexandra Theatre: 6-14 January 2017
  • Aylesbury, Waterside Theatre: 16-21 January 2017
  • Woking, New Victoria Theatre: 23-28 January 2017
  • York, Grand Opera House: 30 January – 4 February 2017
  • Brighton, Theatre Royal: 6-11 February 2017
  • Cambridge, Arts Theatre: 13-18 February 2017: booking info
  • Sheffield, Lyceum: 20-25 February 2017: booking info
  • Malvern Theatre: 27 February – 4 March: booking info
  • Richmond Theatre: 6-11 March 2017
  • Cardiff, New Theatre: 14-18 March 2017: booking info

P.S. It doesn’t hurt that Rupert looks so damned dapper in those clothes!

ETA: There is an interesting article about the lighting here. The lighting equipment was provided by the company White Light.

Reviews

It’s not, as Hamilton himself admitted, “a great work of art”. Poor Rupert Young – playing the manipulative bounder Jack with a judicious mixture of lordly but kindly condescension and explosive viciousness – even got booed at the opening-night curtain-call in Birmingham, as if this was panto. But the psychological essentials of this potboiler hold good, and, as with The Archers’ abuse storyline, who’s to say that real-life doesn’t acquire the hue of dark melodrama when male-female relations hit their nadir? 4 stars from Dominic Cavendish, The Telegraph, 11 January 2017

… the production relies heavily on the performances of its small cast as the plot gradually thickens. 4 stars from Diane Parkes, What’s On Stage, 12 January 2017

Testament to the terrifyingly convincing performance of the sadistic, psychotic Jack Manningham came by the chorus of boos actor Rupert Young received as he took a final bow at the New Alexandra Theatre where the production this week begins a national tour. Young oozed menace as he both charmed and petrified his tormented wife in a twisted power game. Humiliating her with his roving eye and deliberately shaming her before the servants to undermine and ostracise her, a cold chill swept the theatre as a hatred of the character developed. In his Victorian costume, Young swept onto the dimly-lit stage with his huge Jekyll-like shadow looming large and leaving the gripped audience biting their nails in apprehension as the tension built. Review by Diane Davies, Express and Star, 11 January 2017

While Rupert Young’s Jack Manningham is perhaps underplayed in the first half, after the interval he becomes frighteningly intense and scarily unpredictable as the air of threat increases. His moods swing ever more widely as he begins to suspect that something is now happening that is beyond even his control. 4 stars from Selwyn Knight, The Reviews Hub, 11 January 2017

… the real brilliance of Gaslight is unearthed in the joy of the actors’ craft … Going by the stellar performance the cast gave on opening night, you need to get your hands on some tickets, because it sounds like they have a whole lot more, if that’s even possible, to pull out of their theatrical bag. Review by Madeleine Bourne, Redbrick, 11 January 2017

As her bullying husband, Jack, Rupert Young domineers, exuding evil. What begins as a study in mental cruelty swiftly becomes something even darker as the true nature of the man Bella married is brought to light. … You can tell it’s working when the villain is booed during his curtain call! Review by William Stafford, Bum on a Seat, 11 January 2017

… the play’s real chill lies in the warped dynamic between Bella and her husband. Young oozes psychological menace as he slowly picks away at his wife’s grip on sanity … 4 stars from Claire Allfree, Metro, 13 January 2017

This suspenseful play kept me engaged throughout, with each character easily holding my attention. It’s a production that had everything, from gradually building tension to surprising but greatly welcome humour. It’s a shame it wasn’t longer, though – it was such a pleasure to watch that the time flew by way too quickly. Gaslight is definitely one not to be missed. 5 stars from Rhian Atherton, What’s On Birmingham, 11 January 2017

Jack is an increasingly unstable person and there were moments during the performance where the audience were genuinely shocked at the relationship breakdown between the couple; however this is to the credit of Young and Tointon with some incredibly intense and believable action on stage. … If you want to watch a play and like a twist, then this is for you. Witty, mysterious and beautiful all at the same time. Review by Matt Dudley, Black Country Radio, 11 January 2017

Rounding out the cast is the brilliant Helen Anderson as Elizabeth the housekeeper, and the delightful Charlotte Blackledge as the sassy and flirtacious maid Nancy. Anderson is a master at playing an audience and her scenes with Rupert Young’s darkly disturbing Mr Manningham are particularly enjoyable. Charlotte Blackledge, as Nancy, gets the majority of the laughs of the night, flouncing about with a sour look for her mistress and a lusty one for her master. It is clear director Anthony Banks has had lots of fun in the rehearsal room and the cast mesh beautifully. … A thoroughly exciting evening, with a great cast, Gaslight remains a pertinent piece. 4 stars from Carly Halse, Female Arts, 16 January 2017

Rupert Young gives an outstanding performance. He is completely despicable as Jack Manning the coercive, cruel and calculating husband. His manipulative, menacing character is truly hateful. … This psychological thriller, with palpable moments of edge of the seat tension is a real must see production. 3 stars from Melanie Mitchell, Rewrite This Story, 23 January 2017

The plot is by no mean the most challenging of whodunnits, but the production is well worth seeing. The casting is excellent. Rupert Young towers over Kara Tointon’s slight and frail-looking figure, emphasising visually how his character is able to dominate her. And Keith Allen’s bewhiskered detective adds many moments of levity to such a dark plot. The play is driven along by the skills of the lead actors. In particular, Keith Allen, who encompasses the voracious, and sometimes excitable, character of Rough with great aplomb and adds some wonderful comedic moments. Review by Steve Cowell, York Mix, 31 January 2017

Rupert Young as Jack shows enormous stage presence, physically towering over the frail and pasty Bella as he switches from unctuous and patronising to a furious bully in an instant. … The wonderful set and costumes focus our attention on the drama and the details. However, it’s the acting of the three main characters that carry this through – as an audience we know what’s coming, and Gaslight is all the more fun for that. A great evening, catch it if you can. Review by Gary Cook, The Brighton Magazine, 7 February 2017

Rupert Young plays manipulative and deceiving husband Jack with a mixture of haughtiness, condescension and even, at some points, he’s down right vicious. His character is booed at curtain-call, as if this were panto. Not because the character was terribly played, far from that, but without wishing to spoil what happens, the character got what he deserved. Overall, Gaslight is a dark, yet shining example of a thriller done good. Thoroughly recommend. Review by Hannah Hopkins, Quench, 14 March 2017

See also:

The Norwegians (2016)

On 16 November, Rupert did a ‘rehearsed reading’ of The Norwegians, a comedy by C. Denby Swanson, with London-based theatre company Go People.

Links:

I managed to ask Rupert about it when I saw him after Carols in the City, and he said the reading had been a one-off thing – a trial, as it were – which may or may not come to anything.

I also asked Go People for more info, and they kindly replied to say:

This wasn’t a public performance, but rather a reading for industry professionals interested in developing the play further.

Glad to hear you’re as much of a fan of Rupert as we are!

Let’s keep our fingers crossed for a full production, as it seems like fun!

gopeoplethenorwegians500px

People Just Do Nothing (2016)

Rupert plays record exec Joshua in this episode of People Just Do Nothing, in which he is basically ambushed in his office and forced to listen to awful music.

  • Episode: 302 Record Deal
  • Broadcast: 24 August 2016
  • Director: Jack Clough
  • Links: BBC Three; IMDB; Wikipedia.

This episode is currently available on BBC iPlayer.

The following screen captures were taken without permission, but with a whole lot of love.

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He’s allowed to break the fourth wall, as this is all being filmed reality-tv style.
Mostly added for the shoes! Love the shoes and jeans... Not so sure about the cardigan...
Mostly added for the shoes! Love the shoes and jeans… Not so sure about the cardigan…

pjdn-07

No, he really doesn't think so... 'Security!'
No, he really doesn’t think so… ‘Security!’
Just a bit of lip-smacking goodness there...
Just a bit of lip-smacking goodness there…

While the Sun Shines (2016)

This play by Terrence Rattigan was written in 1943, and is set in that period – in the latter parts of the Second World War when London was awash with Allied soldiers not to mention a sailor or two. The action takes place over a 24-hour period, in Lord Harpenden’s chambers in ‘Albany’, a fancy apartment block off Piccadilly in London. The production was directed by Christopher Luscombe.

Alexandra Dowling as Lady Elizabeth and Rupert as Lt Mulvaney. Photo by Tristram Kenton
Alexandra Dowling as Lady Elizabeth and Rupert as Lieutenant Mulvaney. Photo by Tristram Kenton

Rupert plays an American lieutenant, Joe Mulvaney, who befriends the Earl of Harpenden (Rob Heaps) and becomes involved in various ways with the two women in Lord Harpenden’s life, Lady Elizabeth Randall (Alexandra Dowling) and Mabel Crum (Tamla Kari). Mix in a butler, Elizabeth’s father, and a French lieutenant, and the laughs are guaranteed.

The show was very funny, and amusing throughout, even when it became clear that hearts and future happiness were at stake. The set was gorgeously detailed. All the cast were great, and Rob was particularly touching in the early-morning scenes when he seems to have lost everything.

Rupert was his usual superb self, of course. He’s just too good at these romantic and comic roles! Not to mention that we get to see rather more of him than I’ve seen thus far … bonus!

It’s a really fun evening, and I’d recommend going if you’re at all interested.

I said hello to Rupert afterwards at the stage door, and he was his usual charming self. ♥ He is in the process of switching agents to Curtis Brown, though he’s not listed there yet. I also noticed that the theatre programme lists Rupert as appearing in People Just Do Nothing, a BBC 3 show. He said that it was only a couple of scenes – but that’s something new to watch out for. Hurrah!

Reviews

the American Lieutenant Mulvaney, played by Rupert Young (who is like a young Liam Neeson)Nancy Connolly at the Bath Chronicle

very enjoyable summer holiday fare. Yes, it’s a period piece, but a good one. Thoroughly enjoyable. Mike Witton at Stage Talk Magazine

In this flurry of crossed-wires and mistaken identities Rattigan shows himself as a versatile writer and farceur. For those who have only caught his darker works, this is a welcome breath of fresh air.  Marion Sauvebois at the Swindon Advertiser

Rupert Young is excellent as Lieutenant Mulvaney, playing to the full the role of a stereotypical Yank bowled over by meeting English royalty, comically matched by his rival in love Lieutenant Colbert, played with Gallic passion and cod-French accent by Nicholas Bishop. Jackie Chappell at Listomania Bath

Rob Heaps’s charmingly puppyish Bobby is a cheerfully ineffectual individual who after four years in the Navy has failed to become an officer and who sees nothing wrong in his butler tying up his boots each morning, much to the incredulity of Rupert Young’s down-to-earth Joe. … Heaps is ceaselessly endearing as BobbyClaire Allfree in The Telegraph

The Telegraph review makes a great deal of Bobby’s uselessness, but I think his kindness, decency and cheerfulness more than outweigh these considerations. Just because the world was in transition to a more merit-based notion of leadership doesn’t mean that all the old-fashioned values need be thrown out with the bath water. I thought it also counted in Bobby and Elizabeth’s favour that they were perfectly prepared to do war-work and serve their country in rather more humble roles than they might have expected. (It’s worth noting that neither of them make use of her father’s Old Boys’ Network.) Not doomed, I think, when they are adjusting to change and accepting new roles.

… an utterly glorious, hilarious ride from start to finish, bringing a beautifully-directed ensemble cast together in perfect harmony and earning a big shiny gold star for director Christopher Luscombe, who has skilfully revived one of Rattigan’s lesser-known comedies with an invigorating blast of fresh air. All the action takes place in the young Earl of Harpenden‘s apartment in Albany, London (interestingly enough, the luxurious set is an exact replica of Rattigan’s actual apartment, in which Rattigan wrote the play). Melissa Blease in The Bath Magazine

The proceedings unfold over 24 hours in the Albany “chambers” of Bobby, the young Earl of Harpenden.  It’s the eve of his wedding and the show kicks off with a tease when, naked but for a bed-cover, a strapping American officer, Joe Mulvaney, emerges from the bedroom.  All innocent, of course. … it’s delectably droll to watch the whole chaotic sexual license of wartime exemplified by these rather tidily choreographed shenanigans. Romantic rivals who share a chaste bed, the stereotyped Allies are played with engaging panache by Heaps, Rupert Young and Nicholas Bishop as the French lieutenantPaul Taylor in the Independent

Immaculately staged and directed by Christopher Luscombe the cast are outstanding. … Nicholas Bishop (Lt Colbert) and Rupert Young (Lt. Mulvaney) provide much humour in their confusion and attempts to repair the damage. … This is a fine production; the humour is well balanced with impeccable timing whilst the physical theatre set pieces resulting in an absolute treat. Petra Schofield at Theatre Bath

It’s hilarious. Or, at least, this production directed by Christopher Luscombe is. … It is almost perfectly cast. Ann Treneman in The Times

The Philanderer (2016)

Rupert stars as Leonard Charteris, The Philanderer himself, in this play written by George Bernard Shaw. This production is directed by Paul Miller for the Orange Tree Theatre in Richmond, and runs until 25 June.


update 7 December 2016: Rupert has been nominated as Best Actor for The Philanderer, which has also garnered other nominations, in the Broadway World UK awards. You can vote here!


I went to the first show this evening, after an afternoon with Delacroix at the National Gallery and a three-course meal at Carluccio’s. That took care of body and soul, and the play took care of heart and mind!

Not being familiar with Shaw as a playwright, I was surprised by how witty and wordy it all was. Rupert came out firing on all cylinders; he’s just so good at this kind of clever, persuasive dialogue.

The Philanderer production photo by The Other Richard, with Dorothea Myer-Bennett as Julia Craven
The Philanderer production photo by The Other Richard, with Dorothea Myer-Bennett as Julia Craven

Helen Bradbury (Grace Tranfield) and Dorothea Myer-Bennett (Julia Craven) play the women Charteris is involved with, and do a fine job with two rather different characters. Indeed, the whole cast did a terrific job – and it seems unfair to even think about picking anyone out for special mention, though I have to say that Michael Lumsden (Colonel Craven) made me laugh, and made the most of his character’s various actions and reactions.

Continue reading The Philanderer (2016)

Writers Retreat (2015)

Rupert appears as Alisdair in the film Writers Retreat made by MoliFilms Entertainment with director Diego Rocha.

It’s listed on IMDB as ‘drama horror thriller’ with a 2015 release. So far, it seems to have had only one screening, on 16 October 2015, at a film festival in Spain: SITGES – International Fantastic Film Festival of Catalonia. The film’s page on the festival website is here.

The film’s Facebook page currently states ‘Coming to theatres summer 2016’, but alas it seems that was overly optimistic!

Let’s keep our fingers crossed that we’ll get to see this soon, and that Rupert is at least given a memorable death scene!

Ian Philips-McLaren (2015)

Rupert has done a lovely photo shoot with photographer Ian Philips-McLaren … perhaps for renewed self-promotional efforts? Gotta love the results, in any case!

Rupert photographed by Ian Philips-McLaren
Rupert photographed by Ian Philips-McLaren
  • Image used without permission, but with embarrassingly fulsome amounts of gratitude.